Writing in the Disciplines workshops & materials

The theme for AY 2014-2015 is "Writing in the Disciplines."  Writing is a specialized field of study as well as an institutional priority for general education. It is also a fundamental part of every discipline. This year's Faculty Seminar Series focuses on the teaching of writing within a wide range of disciplines from the sciences to the social sciences to the humanities. The three-hour seminar and workshops that comprise this series are explicitly designed for senate and non-senate faculty who, perhaps, have little to no pedagogical training in the teaching of writing, as well as those who regularly teach writing in their courses and want to discuss strategies for improving student writing and their own teaching of it within a supportive environment. The goal is to provide all faculty with practical and efficient strategies for teaching writing in ways that also support effective student learning of disciplinary content.

Schedule of Workshops and Resources

DATE/TIME/LOCATION

TITLE

DESCRIPTION

F. Jan. 23

9-12

KL 397

USTU 10

WRI 10

WRI 100

Math 32

Hamlet Review

Comparative Analysis

 

Writing in the Disciplines: Seminar This seminar will introduce participants to this year's Faculty Series and showcase writing assignments from a variety of disciplines that are appropriate for student writers at various levels. The goal is to encourage participants to begin thinking about the kinds of writing asignments they might develop for their courses and highlight the ways future workshops will support their teaching of writing. Faculty from all disciplines are encouraged to attend and join in the campus-wide conversation about writing. Lunch will be provided, but space is limited so please reserve your spot today! **Please note that this event is required for anyone who wants to receive the certificate.**

M. Feb. 2

1-2

KL 360

Power Point

Handout

Preventing Last-Minute Papers Procrastination on formal writing assignments can lead students to produce last-minute, poor-quality writing. However, if key components of the assignment are broken into smaller tasks that build on each other over time, such sequencing effectively forces students to have a writing process, prevents procrastination and, ultimately, improves the quality of student writing. Join us for a discussion and workshop on how to integrate key components of your assignment into class lesson plans. Please be sure to bring a copy of an assignment you would like to discuss!

Tu. Feb. 24

9:30-10:30

KL 360

Lib Guide

The Library's Role in Writing Depending on your discipline, it is possible that your students have little experience conducting library research in your discipline, which means they might not know what kinds of sources are approporiate, where to find them, or how to cite them properly. This hands-on workshop will introduce you to the various ways our librarians can support your students' research and writing activities and will give you time to explore Ref Works, research tools, and customized course reserach guides. Laptops will be provided, but feel free to bring your own.

W. Mar. 18

11-12

KL 360

Prezi 1

Prezi 2

Handout

Resume Rubric

Cover Ltr Rubric

Conferencing with Students about Writing

Visiting a professor's office hours can be intimidating for students, especially when the focus of the visit is student writing. Come hear a panel of experts discuss how they get students in the door and what happens once they are there.

Th. Ap. 2

2:30-3:30

KL 360

Power Point

Handout 1

Handout 2

How and When to Teach Grammar When reading or writing in your discipline, how frequently is the passive voice used? What about the first person or a personal voice? As these examples begin to suggest, grammatical conventions have disciplinary contexts, which can be identified and shared with students to improve writing outcomes. This workshop will map conventions from across the disciplines and provide insight about where, when, and how to give students feedback on mechanics. Join us for a lively discussion about how to teach grammatical conventions within and across disciplines.

M. Ap. 20

9:30-10:30

KL 360

Power Point

Tip Sheet

Commenting on Student Writing Although commenting on student writing and grading student writing often go hand-in-hand, they are not exactly the same thing. THe comments we write obviously serve to justify the grade a paper receives, but our comments can also help students revise a paper and/or do better on the next one. When commenting, however, it is important to prioritize comments in order to avoid overwhelming students by commenting on everything. This workshop will outline the various roles we play in commenting, as well as what to comment on, how to phrase comments, and where to place them.

Friday, May 8

Location TBD

  Annual CRTE Award Ceremony and Reception

F. Sept. 12, 9-12

KL 360

Workshop Resources

USTU 10

MWP

Chemistry

Math

History

Discussion Questions

Writing in the Disciplines: Seminar This seminar will introduce participants to this year's Faculty Series and showcase writing assignments from a variety of disciplines that are appropriate for student writers at various levels. The goal is to encourage participants to begin thinking about the kinds of writing assignments they might develop for their courses and highlight the ways future workshops will support their teaching of writing. Faculty from all disciplines are encouraged to attend and join in the campus-wide conversation about writing. Lunch will be provided, but space is limited so please reserve your spot today!

W. Oct. 1, 9-10

KL 360

Power Point

Sample Assignments

Nursing Examples

Assignment Peer Review Questions

Learning Goals Questions

Crafting Writing Assignments The way we present a writing assignment to students influences the writing we receive. Consequently, the first step in explaining a writing assignment to students is knowing what you want to see in their writing. A clearly outlined, but not overly detailed assignment prompt can help to improve the quality of student writing and speed up grading. This workshop will address how to use writing for different purposes, as well as how to describe and present those writing assignments to students.

F. Oct. 17, 9:30-10:30

KL 360

Power Point

Sample Rubrics

Questionaire

Designing Rubrics to Grade Writing Providing frequent and timely feedback on student writing can help to improve the writing one receives. A grading rubric will not only speed up the grading process, it will also make grading criteria transparent to students, especially when it is given to them before the paper is due. Students can then use the rubric to check their own papers and provide peer feedback to classmates. In addition, a rubric can help multiple graders of an assignment achieve better consistency in evaluating written texts. This workshop will describe the different types of rubrics and help participants begin to draft their own.

Th. Oct. 30, 1:30-2:30

KL 360

Lib Guide

The Library's Role in Writing Depending on your discipline, it is possible that your students have little experience conducting library research in your discipline, which means they might not know what kinds of sources are appropriate, where to find them, or how to cite them properly. This hands-on workshop will introduce you to the various ways our librarians can support your students' research and writing activities and will give you time to explore Ref Works, research tools, and customized course research guides. Laptops will be provided, but feel free to bring your own.

M. Nov. 10, 1:30-2:30

KL 360

Peer Feedback with Canvas

Peer Feedback Activities & Tips

Assigning Peer Feedback Outside of Class Peer feedback is an integral part of the writing process for writers at every level because it is not until we share our writing with others that we know whether we have communicated clearly. One way to help students improve their writing is to have them read and provide feedback on a peer's paper. A well-constructed peer feedback assignment can help students determine what in their papers needs revision. This workshop will address the importance of peer feedback, the kinds of questions that will prompt constructive feedback, and the various technologies that can facilitate this process.

Th. Dec. 4, 2:30-3:30

KL 360

Power Point

Tip Sheet

 

Commenting on Student Writing Although commenting on student writing and grading student writing often go hand-in-hand, they are not exactly the same thing. The comments we write obviously serve to justify the grade a paper receives, but our comments can also help students revise a paper and/or do better on the next one. When commenting, however, it is important to prioritize comments in order to avoid overwhelming students by commenting on everything. This workshop will outline the various roles we play in commenting, as well as what to comment on, how to phrase comments, and where to place them.
Scheduled as Requested Norming Session Do you have several TAs grading the same writing assignment? Do you want to help them grade student writing more quickly and consistently? Schedule a norming session that will get them all on the same page. Please note that this norming session will work best if the IOR provides, ahead of time, 2-3 writing samples, a description of the assignment, and any associated grading rubric for use at the session. For more information or to schedule a norming session, please contact Amy Fenstermaker, Associate Director CRTE, afenstermaker@ucmerced.edu.